Stakeholder workshop in Germany: How to improve the licensing process for mussel farms?

As part of the Baltic Blue Growth project, a stakeholder workshop focusing on the new draft for the mussel farming license guideline took place in Eckernförde, Germany, on the 26th of April 2018. The aim of the workshop was to examine how to optimize the licensing process for a mussel farm. Improving the effectiveness of legal rules and state regulations is a prerequisite for improving the mussel farming potential of the aquaculture sector. Representative of all involved state authorities of Schleswig-Holstein discussed how the permit process can be simplified and how to ensure the best possible cooperation between the licensing authorities.

On the basis of an imaginary mussel farm, the participants discussed the previous approval process and debated whether there is room for improvement. On the one hand, it is not possible to simplify or shorten the procedure without undermining the regulatory goals. On the other hand, everyone agreed that efficient cooperation between the various authorities plays an important role. An advantage in any case is the early involvement of the responsible authorities. An option to improve the permit procedure could be the set up of an online platform with all the relevant documents and information that would make the internal exchange of information between authorities and companies more transparent. The results of the workshop will be incorporated in the finalization of the approval guideline, which will be published as part of the BBG project.

More information: https://www.submariner-network.eu/projects/balticbluegrowth

BBG_logo_smallEUSBSR flagship label

Advertisements

Partner meeting BONUS OPTIMUS

Partners from the BONUS OPTIMUS project attended a project meeting the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde from the 10th – 12th of April, presenting their newest results on mussel farming to combat eutrophication in the Baltic Sea.

The focus was this time on case studies from Denmark, Sweden and Germany. Besides results on growth performances, filtering capacity or the utilization of mussels, participants discussed how suitable site selection criteria for mussel farming can be established. An essential point is that local habitants as well as tourists need to accept and endorse mussel farms in their regions. To investigate this aspect further, EUCC-D in cooperation with Aarhus University (Denmark) will carry out a survey at the Hagensche Wiek (Rügen Island) where the German mussel farm was installed in 2017.

In addition to the scientific exchange, the project meetings served as a discussion opportunity with experts from regional, national and international ministries, state authorities and research institutions.

More information: www.bonus-optimus.eu

 

 

Beyond 2020: Supporting Europe’s Coastal Communities

bg-1The Estonian Presidency of the EU and the European Commission, will jointly organise a conference on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) on 12-13.10.2017.

This event will represent a unique opportunity for stakeholders wishing to provide their input in the assessment of the EMFF support to the implementation of the Common Fisheries Policy and the Maritime Policy over the current programming period (2014-2020).

It will also allow them to discuss the current and future challenges of coastal communities, as well as potential policy responses.

All stakeholders are encouraged to save the date and plan attendance from the evening of Wednesday 11.10 until the afternoon of 13.10.2017.

For more information, please consult www.EMFF-now-and-then.eu

Salmon farming in crisis with rising sea lice, and escalating use of chemicals

Lepeophtheirus salmonis, or the common salmon louse, now infests nearly half of Scotland’s salmon farms. Last year lice killed thousands of tonnes of farmed fish, caused skin lesions and secondary infections in millions more, and cost the Scottish industry alone around £300m in trying to control them. Scotland has some of the worst lice infestations in the world, and last year saw production fall for the first time in years. But in the past few weeks it has become clear that the lice problem is growing worldwide and is far more resistant than the industry thought. Norway produced 60,000 tonnes less than expected last yearbecause of lice, and Canada and a dozen other countries were all hit badly. Together, it is estimated that companies across the world must spend more than £1bn a year on trying to eradicate lice, and the viruses and diseases they bring. As a result of the lice infestations, the global price of salmon has soared, and world production fallen. Earlier this year freedom of information [FoI] requests of the Scottish government showed that 45 lochs had been badly polluted by the antibiotics and pesticides used to control lice – and that more and more toxic chemicals were being used.

“Sea lice are a natural phenomenon,” says Scott Landsburgh, chief executive of the Scottish salmon producers association. “All livestock on farms, terrestrial or marine, are encountering some kind of parasite or tick, and they’re dealt with. And that’s part of livestock farming. We are no different to terrestrial farms. Problems come and go, depending on biology and the environment. The louse is a hardy parasite. It’s a challenge for Chile and Norway, too. We are spending a lot on all sorts of things.”The salmon-farming industry, which has grown at breakneck speed since the 1970s, knows it has a huge problem, but insists it sees the lice as unwelcome guests that will soon be evicted rather than permanent residents. Rather than dwell on the lice, industry leaders point to the fact that in just 40 years, aquaculture has gone from providing 5% of the world’s fish to nearly 50%, and in Scotland, from a few hundred tonnes of salmon a year to more than 177,000 tonnes in 2015. They argue that new methods to control infestations are being developed and the chemicals being used are safe and degrade quickly, adding that they expect to have found a solution within a few years.
The global companies that dominate ownership of the farms, buoyed by high prices and growing worldwide demand, are confident that they will find solutions. Marine Harvest, the giant Norwegian multinational that grows 40,000 tonnes of salmon in its many Scottish farms, said this week that it needs to develop more effective ways to combat lice. The use of the toxic drug emamectin rising fast, but also that the industry had persuaded the Scottish environmental protection agency to withdraw a ban planned for next year. Other papers showed that the levels of chemicals used to kill sea lice have breached environmental safety limits more than 100 times in the last 10 years. The chemicals have been discharged into the waters by 70 fish farms run by seven companies.
FoI documents  show that the Scottish industry wants to “innovate” by building the world’s biggest salmon farm, which would triple the size of the largest now in operation. It could farm 2m fish at a time, and create as much waste as a city the size of Glasgow. The anwwer to the inevitable lice problems, say environmentalists, is to move the farms further offshore into deeper, colder waters, where lice are less able to survive, or to even put them on land, where they could be better controlled. But this would add greatly to industry costs and require investments of billions of pounds. In the meantime, the companies are using mechanical ways to trim the lice from the fish. These range from pumping the fish through water hot enough to make the lice let go of their hosts, to churning them as if in a washing machine. Both are condemned by animal welfare group Compassion in World Farming, and are known to be expensive and not always effective. Last year the heating of the water on a Skye fish farm led to the accidental slaughter of 95,000 fish. Another 20,000 died in another incident.

Further information:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/apr/01/is-farming-salmon-bad-for-the-environment?CMP=share_btn_link

10th International Forum on Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing, results and EUCC presence

chatham_house_-_geograph-org-uk_-_783965Over 170 delegates attended the 10th International Forum on Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing which took place on the 16 and 17 March. Diverse perspectives and ideas were offered in all sessions; themes included the ‘next steps’ for the FAO Port State Measures Agreement, IUU fishing on the high seas, small-scale fisheries and developing nations, the role of industry and the private sector, technology and big data and the nexus of IUU fishing, geopolitics and resource security.

PowerPoint presentations can now be accessed through the online agenda and a summary of the discussions will be released in the coming weeks.

We would like to reiterate our sincere thanks to the expert speakers and chairs in each of the sessions, and in particular to the forum’s keynote speaker, H.E. Said Jama Mohamed, Deputy Minister of Fisheries and Marine Resources, Somalia.

EUCC Participation

11:45 – 13:15 | March 16, 2017

Session 2 | ‘Tragedy of the Commons’: Regulating the High Seas How can the gap between international conventions and practical implementation and enforcement on the high seas be bridged? A discussion on the implications of IUU fishing on the Arctic sea will follow the formal presentations, raising important questions around fisheries management and high seas governance predominantly through the lens of the Central Arctic Ocean, which may be navigable as early as the first half of this century.

– Are current international conventions and instruments effectively mitigating IUU fishing on the high seas?

– How can we address the intersection of IUU fishing and sustainability in international laws on the high seas? ·

– Does the establishment of the Ross Sea MPA, the largest MPA to date, present a model for future progress in governing the high seas?

Chair and Speaker: Magdalena A.K. Muir

Research Associate, Arctic Institute of North America, Universities of Calgary and Alaska Fairbanks & Advisory  Board Member, Climate and Global Change, Coastal and Marine Union (EUCC)

Presentation:  Arctic Issues Scan, and Two Future Scenarios for the Arctic Ocean, Including: Implications for Climate Change, Arctic High Seas Regulation and IUU Fishing  with pdf found here or at

https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/Magdalena%20Muir_0.pdf

Speaker: Stuart Cory ,  Special Agent,  National Program Manager, NOAA Office of Law Enforcement 

Presentation: Challenges with global enforcement operations
https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/Stuart%20Cory.pdf

 

Speaker: Michele Ameri,  Legal Officer, UN Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea
Presentation: The international legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of the marine living resources of the high seas  

https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/Michele%20Ameri.pdf

Speaker: Jane Rumble, Head of Polar Regions Department, UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Presentation: Regulating Fisheries – from the bottom to the top….

https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/Jane%20Rumble.pdf 

 

Further Information:

Event website  https://www.chathamhouse.org/event/10th-international-illegal-unreported-and-unregulated-fishing-forum

Agenda with links to presentations:  https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/events/special/IUU%20Forum%20Agenda%20Presentations.pdf?utm_source=Chatham%20House&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=8141891_10th%20IUU%20Fishing%20Forum%20-%20Presentations%20%26%20Thank%20You&dm_i=1S3M,4UIBN,O7RQ38,IBBND,1

 

EUCC Presentation:  Arctic Issues Scan, and Two Future Scenarios for the Arctic Ocean, Including: Implications for Climate Change, Arctic High Seas Regulation and IUU Fishing found here or  https://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/files/chathamhouse/Magdalena%20Muir_0.pdf

 

Participate online in the Ocean Forum e-discussions!

Ocean Forum discussions launch

We’re pleased to invite you to participate in the Ocean Forum online discussions,  at the Ocean Action Hub. The discussions aim to engage stakeholders in assessing the challenges and opportunities related to delivering on SDG14 implementation in the run-up to The Ocean Conference. If you’re concerned about the Ocean’s future – as an activist, scientist or government representative – visit the Forum to join the discussions!

Facilitated by expert moderators from the United Nations and civil society, each discussion focuses on one of the agreed Partnership Dialogue themes and implementation of relevant SDG targets. The results will be shared with the conference co-facilitators, Member States and others as inputs into the Partnership Dialogues, Call for Action and Voluntary Commitments processes.

Dr Muir will be speaking for EUCC on “Future Scenarios for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Arctic High Seas Regulation, Ecosystems and IUU Fishing” n the 10th International Forum of Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing

10642349

By Dr. Magdalena A K Muir, Advisory Board Member, Climate and Global Change, EUCC; and Research Associate, Arctic Institute of North America (AINA)

On March 16 2017, Magdalena Muir will be chairing a session and speaking on behalf of EUCC and AINA in the 10th International Forum of Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing at Chatham House,taking place in London on March 16th and 17th (see agenda here Chatham House – 10th International IUU Fishing Forum – Agenda 1.0 and conference website https://www.chathamhouse.org/event/10th-international-illegal-unreported-and-unregulated-fishing-forum).

Dr Muir will be speaking on “Future Scenarios for the Arctic Ocean  and Implications for Arctic High Seas Regulation, Ecosystems and IUU Fishing” in the Session entitled “Tragedy of the Commons: Regulating the High Seas”.

Within her  allotted speaking time, Dr. Muir will present three future Arctic Oceans scenarios for the period of 2025 onwards that will  consider differing economic, environment and  political/governance  frameworks for the Arctic Ocean and adjacent Arctic and Arctic-engaged states including Scandinavia and Europe.

The future Arctic Ocean scenarios will be differentiated in terms of greater focus on environmental and conservation, commercial exploitation or greater militarization or governance shifts. Climate impacts, adaptation and mitigation  within the Arctic and globally will be included in all scenarios, with some variation on adaptation and mitigation under different scenarios

Dr. Muir will develop brief graphical presentation including maps to illustrate  the Arctic Oceans and the  various scenarios and to precipitate discussion among presenters and during the ensuing  Q and A session. This presentation, as well as a report from the event, will be subsequently made available on this blog.

Scenarios are being used is to provide a context for an animated discussion of the Arctic Ocean and other high seas including:near term future of the Arctic Ocean, regions within the Arctic (North America, Scandinavia, Europe and Asia), and Arctic states and other  Arctic-engaged  states; implications for IUU fisheries and their regulation in the Arctic and other high seas, and to allow comparisons and contracts between the Arctic, Antarctica and other high seas regions.

Please see document here  or link below for background information on  status of Arctic IUU fisheries: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic63-3-373.pdf

The website for the event is available here at https://www.chathamhouse.org/event/10th-international-illegal-unreported-and-unregulated-fishing-forum

 

Extract from Agenda 

Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing 10th International Forum 16th and 17th March, 2017

Chatham House | London Day 1: Thursday 16th March 

11:45 – 13:15 | Session 2 | ‘Tragedy of the Commons’: Regulating the High Seas 

How can the gap between international conventions and practical implementation and enforcement on the high seas be bridged? A discussion on the implications of IUU fishing on the Arctic sea will follow the formal presentations, raising important questions around fisheries management and high seas governance predominantly through the lens of the Central Arctic Ocean, which may be navigable as early as the first half of this century.

  • Are current international conventions and instruments effectively mitigating IUU fishing on the high seas?
  • How can we address the intersection of IUU fishing and sustainability in international laws on the high seas?
  • Does the establishment of the Ross Sea MPA, the largest MPA to date, present a model for future progress in governing the high seas?

Chair and Speaker: Magdalena A.K. Muir | Research Associate | Arctic Institute of North America, Universities of Calgary and Alaska Fairbanks

Speaker: Stuart Cory | Special Agent | National Program Manager | NOAA Office of Law Enforcement

Speaker: Michele Ameri | Legal Officer | UN Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea

Speaker: Jane Rumble | Head of Polar Regions Department | UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office